Tag Archives: Curious Case of Benjamin Button

The Curious Case of Craptastic Hollywood

f scott fizgerald

F. Scott Fitzgerald being gorgeous in the sun.

Today I am continuing on with what I have dubbed “F. Scotty Fitz Week” with another post focusing on the literary genius of F. Scott Fitzgerald.

In addition to novels that were outright perfection, Scott also wrote many short stories that originally appeared in publications such as Esquire and the Saturday Evening Post.

One of those stories, The Curious Case of Benjamin Button, was first published in the May 27, 1922 edition of Colliers magazine.

The story is a fantasy about a baby who was born an old man.  A grown-up old man with a white beard and yellowed teeth, who talks, smokes, drinks and scandalizes his parents.  As the years progress, he becomes younger and younger, and eventually his grown children have to care for him as if he is one of their own wee brats.

Overall, it is a beautiful story about one family’s ability to cope with a unique situation. In an age where people with special needs were treated rather inhumanely, Fitzgerald found a way to make a hero out of someone who, in reality, probably would have been hidden from the public. Continue reading

Angie Schaffer

Angie Schaffer is a silent film buff, art snob (she is really into Dada, Surrealism, and German Expressionism), social activist, and 1920s fanatic. She can talk your ear clean off about the Jazz Age.

More Posts - Website

3 Must-Reads By F. Scott Fitzgerald

F Scott Fitzgerald

L-R: F. Scotty Fitz, his only child, a daughter, “Scottie”, and wife Zelda Sayre

In case you didn’t know by now, F. Scott Fitzgerald is my favorite author.  Not only was he an amazing writer, but he was one of those figures in history that lived fast, died young(ish), and should have left a beautiful corpse (oh he was stunning to gawk at…even on bad hair days), but apparently the mortician didn’t do a very good job, slopping makeup everywhere. (Jerk!)

F. Scott Fitzgerald’s literary works are known the world over for their heartbreakingly beautiful descriptions of one of the fastest decades in the 20th century—the 1920s.  And like most good writers, a lot of it (dare I say most of it) was based on his wild life with his wife Zelda Sayre. Continue reading

Angie Schaffer

Angie Schaffer is a silent film buff, art snob (she is really into Dada, Surrealism, and German Expressionism), social activist, and 1920s fanatic. She can talk your ear clean off about the Jazz Age.

More Posts - Website