Everything Old Is New Again

Laurel & Hardy

My two favorite April Fools, Laurel and Hardy (Photo credit: twm1340)

Happy April Fools Day, everyone!  Spring is in the air, it’s the beginning of a new month, and I am excited about the latest Ultimate Blog Challenge, which starts today!

If you are stopping by from the UBC, welcome to my little space on the web.  I’m glad you stopped by.

For all of you who are new to The Little Jazz Baby (even if you aren’t from the UBC), I will take a moment to explain what this blog is all about.  Here you will information about people, historic events, film, and literature that shaped two fabulous decades—the 1920s and 1930s.

There really aren’t a lot of blogs (or websites in general) that focus solely on these decades, and I have to wonder why. They remain decades that generation after generation continue to be fascinated by.

Year after year, filmmakers use subjects from those decades (and remake some of the biggest films from the era).  Fashion designers are inspired by what people were wearing in old photographs, and copy the looks for their lines.  People everywhere fall in love with old jazz, silent film, and popular books from the Jazz Age.

Everything old is new again, and the 1920s and 1930s refuse to die.

Thank goodness!

Why do you think that is?  Is it because people in the fast-paced 20th century yearn for a simpler time?  Is it because the talent and the look and feel of everything was so much better than what we have now?  Or is there another reason people love these two decades so much and continue to romanticize them?

For me, I feel that those decades were the most creative and fun.  Even with the Great Depression, Nazis, and all sort of bad stuff ripping through the world in the 30s, there was so much positive energy.  So much hope.  People knew how to live, how to survive.

I really do hope you enjoy my posts and stick around.  And I hope to post EVERY DAY this month (barring any issues with jury duty coming up on the 17th…*fingers xx’ed I can get out of it*)

And if you like what you see here, please feel free to subscribe, comment, and share my content!

17 thoughts on “Everything Old Is New Again

    1. Angie Schaffer Post author

      Thanks so much for dropping by, A-C! I’m kinda proud of my little space on the web. I’ve introduced people to a lot of things they didn’t know existed, which is exactly what I intended to do when I started this. There are very few resources in the blog world for pre-WW2 German film, so from time to time I focus on that. Especially if it stars Conrad Veidt and Willy Fritsch. :p
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  1. Jacqui Malpass

    There is certainly something very special about these long ago times. I don’t know that life was simpler it was different and I think you have hit on something when you talk about hope. Of course there are still wars and conflicts, but back then it all seemed to be so much closer to home, so many more lives being lost and so community and family were key.

    Good luck with the challenge, I am certainly looking forward to learning new things.

    Reply
    1. Angie Schaffer Post author

      Aye, people did whatever they had to do to survive. Even if it was something as simple as getting lost in a motion picture or daydreaming of better days to come. More often than not, it was sacrificing basic necessities and getting their hands dirty.
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    1. Angie Schaffer Post author

      Thanks, Tracey! It helps when one is truly passionate about the things they post. I’ve tried on all sorts of hats with blogging, but I became bored quickly because I became apathetic toward the subject matter. I’ll never get bored of history and film. ;)
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  2. Priyanka Dey

    Hey Angie!

    A wonderful start to a great experience ahead! Like you’ve written..Hope..So much Hope! :)
    This is my first time into the challenge and I am hoping that I succeed! :D

    Wishing you the very best!
    Priyanka
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    1. Angie Schaffer Post author

      Welcome to the challenge, Priyanka! I know you will enjoy it and be back. It’s a great way to connect with new people and build your blog. I think this is the third or fourth time I’ve done it, and (shh don’t tell), I’ve never finished with a post every day. Last time I purposely did not blog every day because I didn’t have time because of my work schedule, but I still showed up to comment on several posts. Now that I have some downtime from work, I plan on posting more often. Every day even. :D
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  3. The Great Gordino

    Hi Angie,
    I love Laurel & Hardy!
    I was brought up laughing at their movies on TV, and as I grew up, I never stopped laughing!
    My two favourites, Laughing Gravy and The Music Box, will have me giggling every time, which is such a healthy thing to do!
    Don’t even get me started on Gone With The Wind and The Wizard of Oz!
    Looking forward to the challenge of April blogging!
    Cheers,
    Gordon
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    1. Angie Schaffer Post author

      Aw, Laughing Gravy is definitely one of my favorites, too! That dog reminds me a lot of my own late Yorkie with the way he would snap his head up and look annoyed whenever Stan would hiccup. lol

      Reply
    1. Angie Schaffer Post author

      I need to post more about the music of the decades. Maybe do a top five list (I love lists ;p) or something. *scribbles a note*

      Since I am all about history, I could do some posts about what the songs are about, and perhaps profile some of the songwriters.

      Reply
    1. Angie Schaffer Post author

      Thanks, Alana. I should have probably done a post on Staatliches Bauhaus (School of Building) today since it is the anniversary of when the first school opened in Weimar in 1919, but I will save that for next year. ;)

      I am going to fly by the seat of my pants this month, posting about all my favorite things about the 1920s and 1930s.

      Reply
  4. Ian Stuart

    I’ve always loved the music of the 1920s and 30s, I’ll have to write something about Sidney Bechet and Louis Prima, Helen Kane and one Trixie Smith, no relation (I think) to Bessie but a fantasic voice nonetheless. Fats Waller is another one, he had so much humour in his songs but could also be tender with it, you’ll never see that again now. And don’t even get me started on country blues musicians like Big Bill, Sonny Boy 1, Washboard Sam, Peetie Wheatstraw etc. I also have to profess a love for The Original Dixieland Jazz Band, although it’s tarnished a little bit by Nick LaRocca’s racial views. As for the fashion, it’s a shame people don’t look as fabulous as they did in the 20s and even in the 1930s, when the fashions became more sombre (reflecting the economy as it always has), people still looked … smart. Like they had something to be doing, a purpose. I’m currently waiting for my latest little bit of 1920s memorabilia to arrive – a Buster Keaton cigarette card! Ever since I was a kid, if it was possible to travel back in time I would always have picked the 1920s and 30s. But they’re such seductive decades, you WANT to experience them. It’s no wonder they are as romanticised as they are!

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